Conlang

I’ve been dabbling in conlang since I was 10 years old (although I didn’t call it that until I discovered the Brown conlang listserv, Zompist, and Langmaker, years later). As I learned more about linguistics, I abandoned projects with hundreds of hours in them (worn binders placed lovingly on a shelf), and moved on to build something more naturalistic, more un-English, more exciting.

 

ngewshay

Newshay has a rigid VSO word order, and little true inflection. A series of prefixes indicate various “cases” but these are used primarily on nouns other than the subject or object. Noun suffixes express numbers, “few” or “plural,” and possession, honorifics, and diminutives. Verb prefixes indicate tense (and there is a wide range of tenses to choose from!) and simple vs progressive. It features a base-8 number system and a regular phonetic alphabet.

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Meoka

This language features a nominal case system, with three genders, verbs that conjugate for tense, aspect, and mood (but not person, gender, or number), a vertical writing system, and a long vowel sound that is usually expressed as a falling tone. The word order is somewhat variable, but certain conjunctions dictate adjacent verb positions. I am aiming to make it more compact that Ngewshay, and easier to make clear and specific, but more importantly, the phonology will be more specific, and the dictionary will be more nuanced and naturalistic.

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